"What About Drinking?", a ’50s PSA About the Dangers of Alcohol

is weekend before you go out and have a drink or two (or three), remember this one fact: alcohol will kill you. It will, gee willikers! At least it will according to this ’50s PSA about alcohol. Typical of most PSAs from this era, it’s incredibly cheesy and outdated, which makes them hilarious to watch in this decade. Despite its rare occurrences of good points (drunk driving), they’re lost in a sea of awkward dialogue and stilted scenes. It’s actually a bit more open ended than you would think. For more scaremonger-y PSAs, there’s this one and this one. Some Oscar-caliber acting here, folks.

Here’s a Look at Small, Indie Record Stores From Around the World

I don’t personally miss record stores that much. Sure nostalgia has distorted our true memory of the ’90s, but for me, I always found record shops expensive, intimidating (rude clerks who thought they knew everything), and inconvenient. So don’t expect this to be a “technology ruined everything!” post. I’ll keep my Spotify, thankyouverymuch. However, one thing iTunes and Spotify can never replace is the aesthetically pleasing experience of standing in a record store, and by that I mean the feeling of being physically surrounded by music. I’ve always liked the look of records stores–all the posters adorning the walls, the stacks of records, the shiny shrink-wrapped CDs. It’s gorgeous, especially the smaller indie ones located in cramped spaces. It’s like stumbling into a music geek’s incredibly tidy and organized hoard…
Here’s a Look at Small, Indie Record Stores From Around the World

I don’t personally miss record stores that much. Sure nostalgia has distorted our true memory of the ’90s, but for me, I always found record shops expensive, intimidating (rude clerks who thought they knew everything), and inconvenient. So don’t expect this to be a “technology ruined everything!” post. I’ll keep my Spotify, thankyouverymuch. However, one thing iTunes and Spotify can never replace is the aesthetically pleasing experience of standing in a record store, and by that I mean the feeling of being physically surrounded by music. I’ve always liked the look of records stores–all the posters adorning the walls, the stacks of records, the shiny shrink-wrapped CDs. It’s gorgeous, especially the smaller indie ones located in cramped spaces. It’s like stumbling into a music geek’s incredibly tidy and organized hoard…
Here’s a Look at Small, Indie Record Stores From Around the World

I don’t personally miss record stores that much. Sure nostalgia has distorted our true memory of the ’90s, but for me, I always found record shops expensive, intimidating (rude clerks who thought they knew everything), and inconvenient. So don’t expect this to be a “technology ruined everything!” post. I’ll keep my Spotify, thankyouverymuch. However, one thing iTunes and Spotify can never replace is the aesthetically pleasing experience of standing in a record store, and by that I mean the feeling of being physically surrounded by music. I’ve always liked the look of records stores–all the posters adorning the walls, the stacks of records, the shiny shrink-wrapped CDs. It’s gorgeous, especially the smaller indie ones located in cramped spaces. It’s like stumbling into a music geek’s incredibly tidy and organized hoard…

Here’s a Look at Small, Indie Record Stores From Around the World

I don’t personally miss record stores that much. Sure nostalgia has distorted our true memory of the ’90s, but for me, I always found record shops expensive, intimidating (rude clerks who thought they knew everything), and inconvenient. So don’t expect this to be a “technology ruined everything!” post. I’ll keep my Spotify, thankyouverymuch. However, one thing iTunes and Spotify can never replace is the aesthetically pleasing experience of standing in a record store, and by that I mean the feeling of being physically surrounded by music. I’ve always liked the look of records stores–all the posters adorning the walls, the stacks of records, the shiny shrink-wrapped CDs. It’s gorgeous, especially the smaller indie ones located in cramped spaces. It’s like stumbling into a music geek’s incredibly tidy and organized hoard…

“Social Harassment Simulator 2014″ Is a Game Uncomfortably Close to Real Life

Made for Ruin Jam, a game jam that embraced the demise of the video game industry at the hands of social justice warriors and minorities, Social Harassment Simulator 2014 is the kind of experience that isn’t so much a game as it is real life. You play as the anonymous protagonist, a girl minding her own business. There are really only three options: exercise, eat vegetables or donuts, and go to work. But food and work are located at the opposite end of a path lined with jeering men, forcing you to subject yourself to their catcalls every day and night…

The Yetis: “Little Surfer Girl”

The Beach Boys are my favorite band of all time, so I’m always up for something surfy, fun, and filled with sunshined harmony. The Yetis are a four-piece band from Allentown, Pennsylvania. You might be saying, “But there’s no surfing in Allentown,” and you’d be right. But The Beach Boys couldn’t surf either, so does it really matter all that much?

A Reluctant Prince Turns Into a King in the Manga “The Heroic Legend of Arslan”

In Dr. Yoshiki Tanaka’s manga The Heroic Legend of Arslana reluctant young prince named Arslan is destined to rule the city of Pars, but he fears he’ll never be the king his father was. However, at the age of 14, his entire life comes crashing down when his kingdom is destroyed in a bloody war and Aslan is forced to become the leader he was born to be in order to restore Pars to its former glory…

Morning Link Round-Up
Discuss the Nature of Identity in Jess Row’s “Your Face in Mine” [Books]
Goodman: “I Would Die” / “Never” [Music]
An Animated Retelling of How David Bowie, Brian Eno, and Tony Visconti Recorded “Warszawa” [Video]
GL: “What Happened To Us?” [Music]
Third Eye Crime: A Stealth Puzzler Set in a Comic Book Noir [Games]
Artist Spotlight: Cristian Robles’ Monsters and Other Oddities [Art]
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Artist Spotlight: Cristian Robles’ Monsters and Other Oddities

Every once and a while you stumble across something that’s unexplainable in its uniqueness. Not to say its particularly hard to describe illustrator Cristian Robles‘ work. Robles has a colorful, odd sense of style that’s equal parts surreal and childlike. But her work also has a strong narrative component, with lots of drawings featuring scribblings and writings…
Artist Spotlight: Cristian Robles’ Monsters and Other Oddities

Every once and a while you stumble across something that’s unexplainable in its uniqueness. Not to say its particularly hard to describe illustrator Cristian Robles‘ work. Robles has a colorful, odd sense of style that’s equal parts surreal and childlike. But her work also has a strong narrative component, with lots of drawings featuring scribblings and writings…
Artist Spotlight: Cristian Robles’ Monsters and Other Oddities

Every once and a while you stumble across something that’s unexplainable in its uniqueness. Not to say its particularly hard to describe illustrator Cristian Robles‘ work. Robles has a colorful, odd sense of style that’s equal parts surreal and childlike. But her work also has a strong narrative component, with lots of drawings featuring scribblings and writings…

Artist Spotlight: Cristian Robles’ Monsters and Other Oddities

Every once and a while you stumble across something that’s unexplainable in its uniqueness. Not to say its particularly hard to describe illustrator Cristian Robles‘ work. Robles has a colorful, odd sense of style that’s equal parts surreal and childlike. But her work also has a strong narrative component, with lots of drawings featuring scribblings and writings…

Third Eye Crime: A Stealth Puzzler Set in a Comic Book Noir

You’ll probably recognize Third Eye Crime even if you’ve never heard of it. The game opens in a world outlined in heavy ink, sultry music pouring in through your headphones. A protagonist who says “yer” instead of “your” and wears a trench coat. Baby, it’s film noir.
Rathko is a thief, and an excellent one at that. Sure, some of it has to do with his physical abilities, but he’s got an edge that makes him nigh untouchable–he’s psychic. And he’s content pilfering paintings from museums until a redheaded dame with pouty lips slinks through the door and hires him to steal something for her. But all is not as it seems…in fact, when is it ever?
Third Eye Crime: A Stealth Puzzler Set in a Comic Book Noir

You’ll probably recognize Third Eye Crime even if you’ve never heard of it. The game opens in a world outlined in heavy ink, sultry music pouring in through your headphones. A protagonist who says “yer” instead of “your” and wears a trench coat. Baby, it’s film noir.
Rathko is a thief, and an excellent one at that. Sure, some of it has to do with his physical abilities, but he’s got an edge that makes him nigh untouchable–he’s psychic. And he’s content pilfering paintings from museums until a redheaded dame with pouty lips slinks through the door and hires him to steal something for her. But all is not as it seems…in fact, when is it ever?

Third Eye Crime: A Stealth Puzzler Set in a Comic Book Noir

You’ll probably recognize Third Eye Crime even if you’ve never heard of it. The game opens in a world outlined in heavy ink, sultry music pouring in through your headphones. A protagonist who says “yer” instead of “your” and wears a trench coat. Baby, it’s film noir.

Rathko is a thief, and an excellent one at that. Sure, some of it has to do with his physical abilities, but he’s got an edge that makes him nigh untouchable–he’s psychic. And he’s content pilfering paintings from museums until a redheaded dame with pouty lips slinks through the door and hires him to steal something for her. But all is not as it seems…in fact, when is it ever?

GL: “What Happened To Us?”

GL is the new project from Ella Thompson and Graeme Pogson of the Australian soul/funk band The Bamboos. On their own they make slick throwback ’80s synth pop, but they still haven’t completely deviated from their funk roots. Their latest single “What Happened To Us?,” off their upcoming Love Hexagon EP, blends atmospheric synths with dynamic vocals.

An Animated Retelling of How David Bowie, Brian Eno, and Tony Visconti Recorded “Warszawa”

David Bowie’s 1977 album Low is considered by fans as his most underrated. Devoid of accessible tunes, and featuring contributions from ambient experimentalist Brian Eno, the album wasn’t exactly a hit with the masses. In this video, written by Adam Buxton and with animation by The Brothers McLeod, we’re shown how Bowie, Eno, and producer Tony Visconti recorded the track ”Warszawa.”